South Carolina: Two more cases of monkeypox reported

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed two more cases of monkeypox infection in the state. These are the third and fourth cases in the state. DHEC did not say where the affected individuals live in the state. (Video above was from last week when the first two cases in the state were announced) Last week DHEC announced the first two cases of monkeypox in the state. Those cases were in the Midlands and Lowcountry region. Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness, DHEC says. The department says the typical illness begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes that progresses to a rash on the face and body, but we are learning that many cases in the current outbreak doot have the typical onset and the rash may only appear on part of the body. Most infections last two to four weeks. Monkeypox is a reportable condition in South Carolina as a novel infectious agent. Health care providers are asked to notify DHEC of any patient that they suspect may have monkeypox to receive guidance about the recommended evaluation.Monkeypox is not easily transmitted from person to person. It can be spread through prolonged face-to-face contact, skin-to-skin contact including sexual contact, and through contaminated materials (clothing or linens of an infected person), according to DHEC. If you are concerned that you have been exposed to someone with monkeypox infection or have a new, unusual rash, please seek medical attention from your usual health care provider, visit an urgent care center, or call your local health department. Though the risk to the general population remains low, we encourage the public to inform themselves about monkeypox through reliable sources, including the DHEC website and the CDC website.

GREENVILLE, S.C. —

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) has confirmed two more cases of monkeypox infection in the state.

These are the third and fourth cases in the state.

DHEC did not say where the affected individuals live in the state.

(Video above was from last week when the first two cases in the state were announced)

Last week DHEC announced the first two cases of monkeypox in the state.

Those cases were in the Midlands and Lowcountry region.

Monkeypox is a rare but potentially serious viral illness, DHEC says.

The department says the typical illness begins with flu-like symptoms and swelling of the lymph nodes that progresses to a rash on the face and body, but we are learning that many cases in the current outbreak doot have the typical onset and the rash may only appear on part of the body.

Most infections last two to four weeks.

Monkeypox is a reportable condition in South Carolina as a novel infectious agent. Health care providers are asked to notify DHEC of any patient that they suspect may have monkeypox to receive guidance about the recommended evaluation.

Monkeypox is not easily transmitted from person to person. It can be spread through prolonged face-to-face contact, skin-to-skin contact including sexual contact, and through contaminated materials (clothing or linens of an infected person), according to DHEC.

If you are concerned that you have been exposed to someone with monkeypox infection or have a new, unusual rash, please seek medical attention from your usual health care provider, visit an urgent care center, or call your local health department.

Though the risk to the general population remains low, we encourage the public to inform themselves about monkeypox through reliable sources, including the DHEC website and the CDC website.

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